Arts Integrated Lesson Plans

Comin’ Up A Cloud

Ginny Merritt

Students will connect the second grade science standards for weather with Beethoven’s 6th Symphony, Mvt. 4 – The Storm. They will create movement phrases that relate to the parts of the storm in Beethoven’s symphony. They will learn the parts of the water cycle – accumulation, evaporation, condensation, precipitation. They will use bodies, drawings and/or instruments to create a “storm” in small groups.

Materials

Video and CD of performance of Beethoven’s Sixth Symphony, Mvt. 4 (choose a favorite from a Google search)
Water cycle chart (may be prepared with class)
Drawing paper and crayons
Audio version of Beethoven Sixth symphony, Mvt. 4
Charts showing families of the orchestra
Index cards with names of various instruments listed.
My water cycle chant has this rhythm (adapt as desired) –
Rest, ti-ti-ti ta, ta
1 & 2 & 3, 4
_ Ac –cu-mu-la_tion_, etc. (All words have the same rhythm, so it is the movement and instruments that will help the students to acquire the vocabulary.)

Activities

1. Partner talk – personal storm stories, share with class (my grandmother story about comin’ up a cloud)
2. What happens when there is a storm? (Wind, clouds, thunder, rain, sun or rainbow?)
3. Learn/create a water cycle chant using the words accumulation, evaporation, condensation, and precipitation. Which part of the water cycle describes clouds? What are the three main types of clouds? (Cirrus, cumulous, stratus) Choose a movement and an instrument for each part of the cycle. Since this is a cycle, perform this in a circle to emphasize that a cycle, like a circle, is endless. (This is also an opportunity for small group work if desired.)
4. Create a storm with body percussion sounds.
5. Share brief bio of Beethoven. Show Germany on the map. Show pictures of countryside.
6. Watch video of Beethoven’s music. Compare our use of body percussion to create a storm to Beethoven’s use of the orchestra. Show instrument charts. Name the four families.
7. Listen to Symphony No.6, Mvt. 4. Afterwards, discuss the sequence of the storm in Beethoven’s music.
8. Divide into groups – visual arts and movement. Groups will create a way to show the class the sequence and mood of Beethoven’s music.
9. Share work products with class.

Differentiation Approaches

Students will be present their group’s interpretation of the story through movement or drawings. They will identify the four families of the orchestra. They will name the parts of the water cycle and know which part(s) the storm represents.

Assessment

Students will present their group’s interpretation of the story through movement or drawings. They will identify the four families of the orchestra. They will name the parts of the water cycle and know which part(s) the storm represents.

Follow Up and Extension Ideas

1. At the next class, review the water cycle chant. Review the families of the orchestra. Then have the children create a personal metaphor that compares themselves to either part of the water cycle, something from weather, or a family of the orchestra.
2. More work will likely be needed to solidify information about families of the orchestra. Play instrument family games. Listen to families separately.
3. Perhaps have students write a play or poem based on Beethoven’s music or do similar activities using different program music with a story.
4. Share work products with classroom teacher.

Additional Details

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